This unknown species of Munidopsis looks a bit concerned. 
Photo by Rob Stewart. 

This unknown species of Munidopsis looks a bit concerned. 

Photo by Rob Stewart

We gave some eyes to Munidopsis polymorpha, the blind albino squat lobster. 
Photo by Martyx.

We gave some eyes to Munidopsis polymorpha, the blind albino squat lobster. 

Photo by Martyx.

Deep Sea Fauna… with Googly Eyes, for science!

image

Ifremeria nautilei and friends in the western Pacific. Image from Marum.

Last week, I published my last research exploring the communities that live around hydrothermal vents in the Western Pacific. Check the succinctly named Comparative Population Structure of Two Deep-Sea Hydrothermal-Vent-Associated Decapods (Chorocaris sp. 2 and Munidopsis lauensis) from Southwestern Pacific Back-Arc Basins! If that’s a bit too dense for you, check out the summary over at my other blog: 

Beyond the Edge of the Plume: understanding environmental impacts of deep-sea mining

And learn about the incredible, delicate creatures that thrive at one of the planet’s most bizarre ecosystems. 

image

Squat lobsters, Munidopsis lauensis, from the Encyclopedia of Life

Spotted by seelix, Deep Sea Fauna with Googly Eyes, IRL.

Spotted by seelix, Deep Sea Fauna with Googly Eyes, IRL.

Tags: irl vandaleyes

Though not as deep as our usual fair, it’s impossible not to look at this SEM image of 2-day old zebrafish larvae and not think “googly eyes”.
Image by Jurgen Berger and Mahendra Sonawane at Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. 
Hat tip: @bgrassbluecrab
Gratuitous reminder that you should check out my Patreon page if you want to support projects like this.

Though not as deep as our usual fair, it’s impossible not to look at this SEM image of 2-day old zebrafish larvae and not think “googly eyes”.

Image by Jurgen Berger and Mahendra Sonawane at Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. 

Hat tip: @bgrassbluecrab

Gratuitous reminder that you should check out my Patreon page if you want to support projects like this.

This pensive prickly dogfish was spotted in New Zealand and shared by NOAA Ocean Explorer. 

This pensive prickly dogfish was spotted in New Zealand and shared by NOAA Ocean Explorer

Follow up to yesterday’s science paper. Yeti crabs can dance if they want to. 

Tags: yeti crab

Dancing for Food in the Deep Sea

Could there be a better title for a paper about dancing yeti crabs? That was rhetorical. The answer is obviously no. 

In Dancing for Food in the Deep Sea: Bacterial Farming by a New Species of Yeti Crab, Thurber and friends looked at the feeding behavior of the deep sea’s most adorable anomuran. This species of yeti crab—Kiwa puravida—farms bacteria on its claws by waving them through the chemically enriched fluid of a methane seep. The result? Deep-sea squat lobsters the dance for their dinner.

Confusingly, yeti crabs are squat lobsters, which are neither crabs, nor lobsters

Wired joins in on the sea pig love! Seaaaaaaaa Piiiiiggggg!

Though, unfortunately for the author, neither sea squirts, sponges, coral, nor clams are echinoderms. Obvi.

Tags: sea pig

Everybody loves a chimera!
Photo by Sarah Keartes.

Everybody loves a chimera!

Photo by Sarah Keartes.